Children’s Ottobre 1/2014 ~ By the Numbers

After yesterday’s post about the Spring 2014 issue of Ottobre, I was wondering how the sizes were distributed in this issue. So, I decided to count them up!

If you are sewing for a girl:

in size(s):
you have this many options:
50
6
56-68
8
74-86
13
92
18
98
15
104
13
110
18
116-122
13
128
21
134-140
13
146-170
8

If you are sewing for a boy:

in size(s):
you have this many options:
50
5
56-68
10
74-92
12
98
10
104
5
110
8
116-122
6
128
12
134-140
9
146-170
6

A quick note about these numbers. First, I’ve excluded the items in design #3, which are accessories, a headband and slippers for infants. Second, the number of designs for girls is typically higher than those for boys simply because a lot of items for boys work just as well for girls when made in girly fabric. However, a dress is a dress no matter what the materials.

Happy Sewing!
Kelly

Ottobre 1/2014 – Children’s Spring Issue

This season has been such that I’m getting this posted as the Women’s issue is enroute to many. Germs and lousy weather have made things challenging around here, but the spring issue of Ottobre is always a nice pick me up.

Ottobre spring 2014 design 19
Jumping in, I love the owl shirt on design 19. It has a good size range, running from 86-128. It would even fit my 8 year old second grader, though I would have to leave off the owl. The cargo pants in design 18 would work for him. There are two versions of these pants, one for boys and one for girls. The design elements of each are different enough that I did not realize they were the same pattern until I was looking through the instruction set. Both designs 18 and 19 are sure to please both boys and girls depending on fabric choices.

Ottobre spring 2014 design 20
The folks at Ottobre have done something similar with design 20, a pair of comfortable pants described as “Relaxed Fit sweatpants.” I am not sold on these pants. Ottobre wants to convince me they are a “fresh” design with the lowered crotch, but I think that makes them look saggy and ill-fitting. Of course, Minnesota is not the epicenter of fashion, so perhaps this is a coming trend we just have not seen here yet. Either way, I think I will pass on that one. The hooded sweatshirt and knit top with a flared bottom is a cute look.

Ottobre spring 2014 design 28-30
Moving into the 110-146 range, the sets shown in designs 28-30 would work well for my fourth grade girl who can sometimes still wear a 146. She really liked the yoga pants (29) and those will work with some additional length.

Ottobre spring 2014 tween designs
The 128-170 size range offer a comfortable v-neck top and jeans for boys. For plus size boys in this range, there is a long sleeve t-shirt, jacket and jeans. For girls, there is a blouse, a dolman sleeve top, a short sleeve top, jeans and a fleece jacket. I really like the look of the fleece jacket. It looks simple enough to tackle with only 7 pieces. The blouse is so sweet with its pintucks but it might be too cute for my fourth grader. It is hard to know these days.

Ottobre spring 2014 baby designs
Of course, there are some adorable baby things in this issue. There’s a fancy boy’s outfit with overalls, a vest and cap, and a simple but lovely christening gown. For those looking for something more fancy, there is a beautiful silk christening gown as well. Baby girls get a party dress and there are a couple cute pieces made with soft knits for boys and girls.

Happy Sewing!
Kelly

Girl’s Curved Raglan – Ottobre 3/2001

It’s a brown thread marathon!

Curved raglans are a favorite of mine. I have used this issue for the curved raglan in smaller sizes, and was relieved when I went back to it this year and found they had continued the shirt up to a size 170 in this style in pattern #35.

Curved raglan long sleeve top

Since this is an early edition of Ottobre, the contents are all in Finnish, so I have no idea what the directions really say. However, I can figure out that it wants me to use a 3.5cm wide piece of ribbing for the neck binding, and that I should construct it in the same manner as pattern #19, which is the version of the pattern in sizes up to 140. This pattern also has a flower applique that I omitted.

Fortunately, it’s just a t-shirt, and I have made lots of t-shirts, so I don’t really need the instructions for putting it together. (This is good since the instructions for #19 are also in Finnish!) I have heard, though, if you have one of these early magazines and are trying to make an item where the instructions really would help, you can contact the folks at Ottobre and they will provide an English translation for you.
Curved raglan long sleeve top

I always go back and forth about whether I should topstitch the seam between the body and sleeves. It seemed like it would be more distracting with the horse print. If I do this shirt with solid colors, contrasting topstitching might be a good way to add interest.

Happy Sewing!
Kelly

Ottobre Spring 2012 #26 – take 2

After making Jack this top last week, I realized I should have continued while I had my machines threaded with brown thread.
Mahpee long sleeve top
This is the same pattern as before, the #26 Mahpee raglan long sleeve t-shirt from Ottobre 1/2012 in size 134. I didn’t bind the neckline on this one, I just used 2″x15.5″ of the same fabric I used on the sleeves and back, stitched the short ends right sides together and made the neckline from that. I think it works a little better.
My not always cooperative model:
Mahpee long sleeve top
Why yes, we do still have Halloween candy! Do you have children with blue tongues at your house as well?

Happy Sewing!
Kelly

Sewing for Boys: Ottobre 1/2012 #28

This could have an alternate title of “Things that seemed like a good idea at the time (but really weren’t)”.

Let me start by saying that there are no problems with the pattern itself. In fact, I’m planning to use the pattern again soon.

Whirlwind Indian T-shirt Ottobre 1/2012

Actually, in that picture, it mostly looks okay. But, when Jack has it on, you can see the problem. Try not to notice the mess I’m making playing in Photoshop this morning…

Modeled T-shirt #28 Ottobre 1/2012

The color block stripe is HUGE! It’s like “HELLO! I have a GINORMOUS green stripe on today!” Doh. Usually when I color block, I start it at about the armpit. This one started about an inch too high.

Oh, well. Now he has a shirt that he can wear on the weekends. And spill stuff all over. :)

Here are some of the other pics from this morning:
Outtakes

I think I’ll do this pattern again in a solid. Maybe with stripes down the sleeves? That could work…

Happy Sewing!
Kelly

Sewing for Boys – Ottobre 1/2012 #26

This is the Mahpee raglan t-shirt pattern from the Spring 2012 Ottobre.
Ottobre Spring 2012 Mahpee
Both fabrics are nice soft cotton interlocks, very comfortable materials. This is size 134. Ottobre kind of leaves you on your own for the neck binding. I used one of my double fold bias binder attachments on my coverstitcher, starting with a piece that was 1.75″x20″ and then clipping the excess.

This is my 7 year old, he is 132cm tall and the 134 size fits him pretty well. The sleeves are a touch long, but in a month they’ll be perfect and in two months they’ll probably be barely okay.
Ottobre Spring 2012 Mahpee model

This is what I got when I asked him to smile for real. Crazy boy. This fabric print is one of those I feel like we are just barely getting away with at his age. Second grade seems to be the end of cute, but these moose and bears were deemed okay.

As I’ve come to expect from Ottobre, all the pieces fit together nicely and it was a quick project.

Jack grew a lot over the summer and needs long sleeve shirts now that fall is officially sticking around, so expect more boy stuff here soon.

Happy Sewing!
Kelly

Ottobre 4/2013 – #33 “Ruler” raglan t-shirt

girl's raglan tee shirt top
This is a size 152, made for my daughter who will be 10 in a couple months. She’s tall and has her mom’s gorilla arms. Poor kid.

I added length to the sleeves and body. The arms seem a bit snug, though they don’t look it in the Ottobre photo, so I’m not sure what that’s about.

If you’re playing the stash game, this one was worth 3/4 yd fabric + one notion point (size tag), so 7pts. And that brings my total for the month to a whopping 12.33 for the month. Look out stash gamers!

Happy Sewing!
Kelly

Ottobre 5/2013 has landed

It’s always fun to flip through the latest Ottobre pattern magazine when it arrives. This issue is no exception.
Ottobre Woman Winter 2013

This coat is done up in wool, but I’d like to give it a try in a heavy Polartec fleece.
Ottobre Wool Coat

There are a couple tops that are also extended as dresses. I like this raglan. The fabric choice in the dress gives it a different look, too.
woman's raglan top or dress pattern

There are a couple blouse patterns and some dressy office clothes that I don’t see myself wearing, but they are nice looking if I were in need of such a thing. This wrap dress as cute and not too dressy. I just don’t know where I would wear it!
woman's wrap dress pattern

Did you get this issue? What are you planning to sew?

Happy Sewing!
Kelly

Tutorial: Easy Play Dress

This tutorial was created for Sewing Mamas by sewingmel, who can be found blogging here.

Items needed:
-your favorite girl’s t-shirt pattern
-knit fabric for bodice
-woven or knit fabric for skirt
-foe or binding for neckline

Step 1:
Adjust your favorite t-shirt pattern. Mine is Ottobre 4/04 #36. If you don’t have this issue, please buy it today! It is so worth it!

A: Draw a line from the underarm seam to the center of your shirt. I drew it slightly sloping down, but you can go straight across if you like. This is the dotted line in the picture below step B.

B: Draw a solid cutting/folding line as far away from the dotted line as you like. I just did a 1" line this time, but I do 2-3" for bigger sizes.

Step 2:
Cut out front, back, and sleeves. This can be done with long sleeves, short sleeves, or no sleeves (you would need foe for the armholes).

Step 3:
Sew up shoulders, and attach sleeves. Pretend that you are sewing up a regular t-shirt for now.

Step 4:
Finish sleeve hems any way you like. I just folded under and used a zig-zag stitch. You could also coverstitch, use a rolled hem, use trim, or use foe. The choice is yours! Be creative!

Step 5:
Pin each arm and underarm together. Sew last seam in shirt.

Step 6:
Decide how long you want to make your skirt. I made mine 16 inches for a 2T/86.

Cut a long rectangle the width of your fabric (if woven) or about double the width of your waist by your desired length.

If you are making a much larger dress, you may need 2 lengths of fabric for the skirt.

Step 7:
Finish your hem any way you like. See step 4. I turned mine under 1/4" and again at 1".

Step 8: Please remember this step! I always forget it!
Mark your four equal parts (front, sides, and back). Your back seam is not finished at this point. I kept in mind that I would use 1/2" seam to take care of the selvage I did not cut off.

Step 9:
Sew 2 gathering lines about 1/4" apart along top edge of fabric. (Pay no attention to the presser foot. The stitches are on the far right.) Gather up skirt.

Step 10:
Match up midpoints of skirt and shirt and pin fabric right sides together. Sew back seam shut.

Step 11:
Sew bodice to skirt.

Step 12:
Finish neckline with foe, binding, or ribbing. I chose foe.

You are finished!

Looks great, thanks Mel!

Happy Sewing!
Kelly

Ottobre Sewing Pattern Organization – take 2

I’ve warned you about my love of organizing things, right?
pattern binders
I haven’t been sewing much since I went to quilt class, but I did a bit of organizing.

At some point, we were discussing organizing magazines and Bobolots (her forum name) said these were great for magazines. I checked them out and they are great! More on that in a moment. Check these out!

When they first arrive, six of them are stuck together:
pattern binders 1

So you pull them apart:
pattern binders 2

pattern binders 3

Then you take out the middle piece – this is where the magazine pages will slide through.
pattern binders 4

And then you need to poke out the little holes for the binder rings to go through. You can stack a couple of these together and push them out.
pattern binders 5

I put mine over a couple of my pattern weights because it’s easy to push through the holes that way and the little plastic pieces don’t go flying all over.
pattern binders 6

For the children’s issues, I use two binder holders because it just seemed like it needed the extra strength. I’m not sure it was necessary, but I had enough, so I just went with it. :)
pattern binders 7

You can just slide them over one corner a bit…
pattern binders 8

And then all the way to the middle of the magazine:
pattern binders 9

Hopefully you slid it through with the holes on the outside:
pattern binders 10

And then the holes just go in the binder rings!
pattern binders 11

Stick them all in binders and you’re set. So pretty….
pattern binders 12

I highly recommend the seller named rvbookseller listed in the “new from” link, especially if you want to get a whole bunch. That seller also offers them in a pack that contains 120 of them for a very reasonable price. When you buy them individually, the shipping is killer. The seller shipped quickly and answered my questions with lightning speed as well. The link is a Sewing Mamas affiliate link, but I’d recommend the seller even without it. :)

You didn’t notice that my Ottobre changed to three different issues along the way, did you? No, you’re too nice to mention it, thank you! ;)

Happy Organizing!
Kelly

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